White House Launches Website App to Visualize Climate Change

It’s mindblowing to think that such a high percentage of people in developed nations, including many of our own government officials, believe that climate change is either a hoax or just simply not true. (Or the more likely: willful political refusal of acknowledgement.) This new development from the White House website might turn some heads.

This National Geographic article poses the most pressing questions in the most relevant of times. Be sure to check out the proposed ideas at the bottom, contribute one of your own if you wish, and read the referenced article (hyperlink) “Powering Our Urban Future: Spotlight on Turkey.”

conganh

ombuarchitecture:

For the 8th Chinese Flower Expo in Wujin, China, Lab Architecture Studio designed two pavilions to honor the event, the Art Exhibition Pavilion and the Science Exhibition Pavilion. This winning design explores the relationship between the water and the petal and expressing the tension found between the Natural landscape and the iconic culture body. The ecological building design draws upon the natural geographical features and also promotes sustainability and the natural ecology.

via arch2o

Absolutely breathtaking. Wow!

TEDxAtlanta:  Ellen Dunham-Jones, a professor at Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture and board member of the Congress for the New Urbanism, gives a TED lecture about the impacts of suburban life and the importance of retrofitting suburban areas and infrastructure to mitigate environmental impacts and improve performance.

Because, “from the perspective of climate change, the average urban dweller in the U.S. has about one-third the carbon footprint of the average suburban dweller.” 

thisbigcity
urbanplannerholic:

dashedlines:

WORKac’s version of vertical farming combines migrant farmers’ housing in a series of stepped terraces with a farmer’s market and public space below. The terraces allow in-soil growing (and a small golf course), duplicating the surface of the site once. The entire project is supported, literally, by culture with sculpture-structures holding it up. Project commissioned by New York magazine.
(via Locavore Fantasia — Work Architecture Company)

Food,

I love this concept

urbanplannerholic:

dashedlines:

WORKac’s version of vertical farming combines migrant farmers’ housing in a series of stepped terraces with a farmer’s market and public space below. The terraces allow in-soil growing (and a small golf course), duplicating the surface of the site once. The entire project is supported, literally, by culture with sculpture-structures holding it up. Project commissioned by New York magazine.

(via Locavore Fantasia — Work Architecture Company)

Food,

I love this concept

A remarkable display of ecological architecture. Eye candy for the environmental designer—or any designer for that matter. Conceived and rendered by Richard Hassell and Wong Mun Summ.

From InteriorDesign.net:

What if you didn’t just replace the trees and plants uprooted during construction but multiplied the greenery, seamlessly and sustainably? That’s what Richard Hassell and Wong Mun Summ did at this hotel, conceived to rise from a garden. The two founding directors first evoked the outdoors figuratively in the drive-in entry plaza, where bonsai and rock formations are referenced by the contoured precast-concrete surface overhead. This outdoor space then flows effortlessly into the lobby, where planted islands flourish beneath a ceiling sculpted with plasterboard and fiber-reinforced concrete forms that echo the exterior’s. Above the lobby, the top of the podium from which the guest towers rise is landscaped with an infinity pool surrounded by cabanas that resemble colorful birdcages by day and floating lanterns at night. The towers themselves, containing 637 rooms and suites, are glass wrapped every few stories by the hotel’s most exotic shared amenity: undulating “sky gardens” totaling an incredibly lush 160,000 square feet. 

See more at:

http://m.interiordesign.net/projects/detail/2261-2013-boy-winner-hotel-common-space/#sthash.J221c4T2.dpuf